News Reality

Moonshot

by www.huffingtonpost.com
If you watched this year's Super Bowl, you may have seen an ad for Audi's R8 V10 plus. Titled "The Commander," Audi described the ad the following way: "'The Commander' tells the story of a retired astronaut who rediscovers his lust for life. Viewers watch as the man, surrounded by memories of the golden age of space exploration, sits solemnly, deep in reflection. When his son hands over the keys to a new Audi R8 V10 plus, he gets behind the wheel and relives the thrill of a rocket-like ride under the stars. Viewers watch as newfound life stirs within the Commander. Audi reminds us that amazing things happen when we shoot for the moon." In the commercial, the former astronaut, refusing his dinner, doesn't appear in reflection so much as clinical depression. Fortunately for the burned out commander, the Audi R8 V10 plus rockets from 0 to glory days in only 2.6 seconds, re-igniting the astronaut's emotional afterburners. A quick spin behind the wheel turns out to be just the tonic the commander needs to transform his dismal terran world. Maybe being marooned on Earth isn't so bad after all. It's a really good thing that restoring the thrill of lunar exploration is as easy as turning the ignition of a hot German sports car, because Americans can't go to the moon anymore. It's been nearly 44 years since the ascent stage of Apollo 17's lunar module Challenger lifted off from the Taurus-Littrow valley on December 14, 1972. Americans have not set foot on the moon since. As it turns out, we can't afford a return trip. NASA's budget has plummeted back to Earth right along with the commander, falling nearly 90% from 4.41% of GDP in 1966 to 0.47% in 2015. Even if we could find the money to return to the stars, we still lack the grey matter. Over the decades since America built moon rockets, its students' math scores have burned up on reentry, dropping to 36th in the world. While the conventional wisdom is that the mighty Saturn V that carried the Apollo astronauts to the moon was lifted into outer space by rocket fuel, in reality, it was carried aloft on the shoulders of the world's best-educated workforce. Many of those rocket scientists were educated courtesy of the GI Bill, which provided a range of benefits for veterans returning from World War II. Nearly eight million veterans took advantage of the GI Bill's education benefits, enabling veterans to get college or vocational education. Management guru Peter Drucker described the GI Bill as "the most important event of the 20th century" and credited it for the rise of America's modern knowledge economy. Historian Ed Humes said that "the scientists and engineers and teachers and thinkers who brought in the information age, who took us to the moon, who waged the cold war, you name it - all those men and women were educated through the GI Bill." The bill provided education for 14 Nobel Prize winners, three Supreme Court justices, and three presidents. Moon rockets weren't the only things America was building during its golden space age. During the 30-month period when we sent 21 men to the moon, the north tower of the World Trade Center, the world's tallest building, was completed on December 23, 1970. And, on October 29, 1969, the year Neil Armstrong took one giant leap for mankind, the first message was transmitted on an inter-computer network that would later become known as the "Internet." These are fond memories of American greatness. America can no longer send rocket ships to the moon, and its tallest building no longer makes the world's top five list. Moonshots and tall buildings aren't just about national bragging rights. They are biproducts of a country's intellectual quotient and its priorities. In 2016, some look to restore American greatness by building a great wall. That's actually been tried before. China built one in the 3rd century BC. Over time, they found that, while walls are effective against invading Mongol hordes, they are not terribly useful when it comes to advancing a culture of innovation in the 21st century. Ironically, while some in America are running the Qin Dynasty playbook to restore American greatness, China has instead embraced America's 20th-century game plan, with particular emphasis on education. Chinese students have the world's highest PISA math, science and reading scores. China also has a rover on the moon, two of the world's five tallest buildings, as well as a planned lunar base. Not coincidentally, China is expected to overtake the US as the world's largest economy in 2018. By studying America, China has learned well that education truly is the key to success. Somehow, that lesson was lost in translation between generations in America. Education is no longer considered essential so much as elitist. Having lost our ability to build great things, we instead seek to regain the perception of greatness through fast cars and great walls. Ultimately, America and China's strategies for greatness come down to perception versus substance. China wants to be great. America wants to feel great.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


Read Full Article On www.huffingtonpost.com
Latest
If you're a fan of the BlackBerry's classic physical keyboard, you will have reason to celebrate when the last product designed in part by the former smartphone leader becomes available in April.
The "Uber" for Yoga instruction promises instant visits        
Here are four ways your making your tech life harder and how to fix it        
Our daily pick of the best free Windows software – a brilliant tool for quickly editing MP3 and WAV files.
Which personal assistant will come out on top?
A new study had found that children in London schools are exposed to toxic air.
BlackBerry’s next Android smartphone finally has a name, as more details about the phone are confirmed.
Some prefer to go to the Caribbean, others like a ski trip in the mountains, and some people just want to hang out at home. Regardless of your preferences, everyone needs a vacation every once in a w
The sky above parts of Earth's Southern Hemisphere will be illuminated Sunday in a "ring of fire" during the first solar eclipse of 2017, NASA said.
China could become the world's leading tech power within ten years was just one of the stand-out points made by dealmakers and VCs at Silicon Dragon's recent forum in Tel Aviv.
Considering that the Nintendo Switch is almost upon us and the PS4 has a growing library of games, can the games industry really support Microsoft’s Scorpio?
Seven Special Touches That Make La Residence in Franschhoek, South Africa, Stand Above the Rest
Richard Spencer, a white supremacist and the director of the National Policy Institute, has made quite a few headlines in the past few months. He was kicked out of the Conservative Political Action C
In a fascinating interview with both Hiroyuki Yamaga and Yoshiyuki Sadamoto of Gainax, they talk about the anime studio’s future but also openly explain the unfortunate reality surrounding crowdfundin
Every player's experience in 'The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild' will be unique. Here are some of my stories.
Walmart has launched a high-tech shopping experience at a handful of locations with its new and improved Scan & Go app that lets you click to pay and skip the checkout line.
Clever ideas to maximize the space in your itty-bitty kitchen.        
The anime movie adaptation of Tsutomu Nihei’s hugely popular manga 'Blame!' is set for release this May.
The Film Independent Spirit Awards are this Saturday and while many won’t be able to attend the event, you can still watch on television or stream it online.  The Spirit Awards will air live on TV on
Warren Buffett or Al Gore? One is selling Apple shares. One is buying.
The Internet of Things drove many of the mergers and acquisitions in 2016, EY reports. For 2017, keep your eye on artificial intelligence and machine learning.
There is more to the story about Tesla’s CRO resigning than we will ever know.
In this excerpt from the #TalkingTech Live broadcast, Joe Fernandez, the founder of Joymode, tells why we should ditch our stuff, and use his rental service instead. Who needs camping equipment that w
Stardust has been a core part of Pokémon GO since launch, but it's a limiting factor in upgrading non-essential Pokémon, which goes against the spirit of the handheld original.
In this excerpt from the #TalkingTech Live broadcast, Milana Rabkin, the founder of the Stem app, talks about how she helps video creators and musicians get paid for their online work.   
Microsoft’s India-born chief Satya Nadella today asserted that there is no place for “senseless violence” and bigotry in the society as he condemned the killing of an Indian techie in a shooting inci
Uber sexism and court woes, Facebook and Wave lead our rewind of top tech stories        
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Berkshire Hathaway Inc's gain on its investment in Apple Inc. stands at more than $1.6 billion after shares of the iPhone maker surged.
A coding error led to chunks of potentially sensitive data ending up unsecured on different websites. Video provided by Newsy        
In this excerpt from the #TalkingTech Live broadcast, Ruben Dua explains how his Easypose app works for on-demand yoga instructors.        
The US space agency NASA's lost football-field-sized balloon with a telescope hanging beneath it has been recovered Antarctica from after a year of its flight.
A Virginia man who died at home while playing a 24-hour video game marathon was part of an online live-streaming community where members sometimes go to extremes to build their audiences, experts say.
Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. Researchers discovered tha
A powerful class of antibiotics provides life-saving relief for people with cystic fibrosis; however, a new study for the first time reveals the levels at which high cumulative dosages over time signi

Recent News

Game thread: Michigan hosting No. 14 Purdue

4 p.m., ESPN2, WWJ-AM (950): U-M's senior day comes against perhaps the Big Ten's best team        
Read Full Article

Game thread: Detroit Tigers clobber Houston Astros, 11-4

1:05 p.m., WXYT-FM (97.1): Tigers host another team's spring training opener today in Lakeland        
Read Full Article

Matt Van Dyk's improbable Michigan State career winding to a close

Matt Van Dyk's improbable journey took him from junior college point guard to a starting power forward in the Big Ten.        
Read Full Article

Central Michigan AD Dave Heeke leaving for Arizona

Central Michigan athletic director Dave Heeke named Vice President for Athletics at Arizona        
Read Full Article

Should Detroit Red Wings expose Petr Mrazek to Vegas Golden Knights?

Red Wings need to decide whether to stick with Petr Mrazek, or go with Jimmy Howard and Jared Coreau        
Read Full Article

Detroit Tigers hit four home runs, hammer Houston Astros, 11-4

Tigers hit back-to-back-to-back homers, then Miggy gets plunked; Verlander throws two scoreless innings        
Read Full Article

Jamie Lynn Spears' Daughter Maddie Aldrige Is ''Fully Recovered'' and Back to ''Normal Activities'' Three Weeks After ATV Accident

Jamie Lynn Spears' daughter Maddie Aldrige has returned to her normal life after an ATV accident left the 8-year-old in critical condition. Spears shared an update to Instagram on...
Read Full Article

Kate Beckinsale and Kerry Washington Showcase Daring Looks at Film Independent Spirit Awards 2017

Kate Beckinsale and Kerry Washington got playful with their fashion on the blue carpet at the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards Saturday. The British actress sported a daring look; a...
Read Full Article

Mayor of London suggesting Scottish nationalism is 'the same as racism' made people mad

Including Nicola Sturgeon.
Read Full Article

Popular Finance

 

$100K 'Gifts' Plus Pay To Wear Oscar Attire -- Two Reasons IRS Watches Academy Awards

With free gifts, the Academy Awards and tax time always go together. But this year, there are extra tax issues for Oscar celebs paid to wear designer clothes.
Read Full Article
 

Why your retirement nest egg could be hit for £20,000

The Government has set out its thinking on the future for work pensions where employees are promised an income according to how long they have worked and their salary.
Read Full Article
 

Shares in parts maker Trifast up by 150%

In February 2009, as the financial crisis hit home, Trifast shares sank to below 10p. Former chief executive Malcolm Diamond came out of retirement to become executive chairman.
Read Full Article
 

Try on this tech from Metail for size

Metail co-founder Tom Adeyoola had the idea to create ‘3D’ versions of online shoppers in 2008 after his wife complained about her clothes-buying experiences.
Read Full Article
 

Freelancers contributed £119bn to the UK economy last year

The contribution was driven by a highly skilled flexible workforce of two million freelancers – a 43 per cent increase since 2008.
Read Full Article
 

‘Help wanted’ app is just the job for finding local roles

Users can submit photos of ‘help wanted’ and ‘we’re hiring’ signs, such as those in shop windows or notice boards, and receive Amazon giftcard points for every approved submission.
Read Full Article
 

Sales sparkle for British tonic mixer firm Franklin & Sons

The firm has reported a four-digit percentage rise in sales in the past year and invested in further facilities in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, to cater for growth.
Read Full Article
 

Town Centre Securities nurtures profits 

In 1959, Arnold Ziff founded Town Centre Securities, a regional property business focused on Leeds and Manchester.
Read Full Article
 

Lord Kerslake; 'The revamp of rates must go ahead'

Now a member of the House of Lords and free from his civil service constraints Lord Kerslake is free to voice his worries. And he has a few.
Read Full Article